cvonrenesse's blog

Blog Posts by Dr. Christine von Renesse

 

Hello, my name is Nicholas Taliceo and I am senior at Westfield State University. I’m a Mathematics major and I love it. I’ve had some amazing experiences – I’ve attended and presented at numerous conferences including the 2015 JMM conference in San Antonio, TX, and had the opportunity to experience undergraduate research, just to name a few. Interestingly, only a few years back, I would have never thought that I would be doing what I’m doing now…

Dana Ernst Teaching

This blog is part of our guest blog series: Dana Ernst is an assistant professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, AZ. We met him at the IBL workshop a few years ago, where we noticed that besides being a committed cyclist he knows a lot about using IBL in many different classes. Dana is co-author of the wonderful blog Math Ed Matters .

Angie Hodge

We met Angie Hodge at the 4-day IBL workshop run by Stan Yoshinobu 3 years ago. Besides competing in 100 mile long trail runs (yes, really!) she knows a lot about teaching IBL in calculus and in larger classes. Angie teaches at the University of Nebraska, Omaha. She also co-authors a wonderful IBL blog Math Ed Matters with Dana Ernst.

Matt Jones is sharing some of his technology ideas for the IBL classroom with us: "A few years ago, I got involved in a professional development project for middle school mathematics teachers where all of us were using iPads. Partially as an outgrowth of that project, I started a blog called The Math Switch . In this post, I am going to detail the workflow that emerged in the first year of the project."

 

Steven Strogatz' wrote a blog post about what it was like to be a beginner at teaching through inquiry. This second part contains his experience of teaching a Mathematics Exploration class at Cornell University using ideas from "Discovering the Art of Mathematics":

Last fall, for the first time in my career, I tried a new way of teaching. Instead of lecturing, I gave my students puzzles and questions to explore together in small groups. What happened over the rest of that semester turned out to be the most astonishing, uplifting experience I’ve ever had as a teacher.


 

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