cvonrenesse's blog

Blog Posts by Dr. Christine von Renesse

 

In this blog Faith McNamee, a senior at Westfield State University, describes her learning about teaching with inquiry as a teaching assistant in Pre-Calculus. Faith describes how unreachable the goal of teaching with inquiry seems, even if you are convinced that this is how you want to teach. But being a TA helped her get closer to her goal.
 
 

In this blog, Elizabeth Azinheira describes how reading the book "Routines for Reasoning" and implementing the ideas has changed her teaching. In her intervention classroom, Liz carefully designs lessons that allow all her students to work at their learning edges. Liz was supported in making these changes by Dr. Christine von Renesse in a graduate course by special arrangement which included weekly video meetings and several classroom observations. After telling her personal story, Liz provides an overview of the routines and makes some of her lesson plans available for others to use.
 
 

In this blog post Professor von Renesse and her students describe their teaching lab class. If we believe that learning happens best in an inquiry-based way then this applies not only to learning mathematics, but also to learning how to teach mathematics. The idea of this lab class is to create a learning environment in which college students can experiment with teaching in a high school setting and learn for themselves what works best and why.
 
 

In this blog Drs Phil DeOrsey and Christine von Renesse describe an activity that is especially helpful in getting student buy-in. We let the students explore Islamic Geometry -- they create designs using compass and straight edge, as well as using Geogebra . For their final "achievement" we explain two different ways of exhibiting student artwork.

In this blog, Phil DeOrsey and Christine von Renesse describe ideas behind student resistance and student buy-in. A great resource is Tolman’s book “Why Students resist learning: A practical model for understanding and helping students”. He uses the Integrated Model of Student Resistance to explain how metacognition, cognitive development, negative classroom experiences, and environmental forces (work, family, culture/racism, disabilities) influence student resistance. It is tempting to think that student behavior only results from our facilitation during class but that is rarely the case.

Pages